Author Topic: Video Demonstrating WinPatrol  (Read 8610 times)

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Offline Corrine

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Video Demonstrating WinPatrol
« on: July 19, 2014, 01:22:51 PM »
The video below is a nice illustration of the features of WinPatrol, particularly for new users of WinPatrol.  Note that some of the features illustrated are only available for WinPatrol PLUS users:  the free version of WinPatrol is limited in the "Patrol Time" setting for monitoring for up to 99 minutes. WinPatrol PLUS monitors in real time so notification is immediate. Registry Monitoring, Knowledge Base access and ActiveX control are also WinPatrol PLUS features.

For a full list of features see WinPatrol FREE vs PLUS

Video:  http://youtu.be/vLvALORtSEw


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Offline JDBush61

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Re: Video Demonstrating WinPatrol
« Reply #1 on: July 24, 2014, 03:29:50 AM »
Thanks for the info, Corrine.

I'm still trying to understand the basic WinPatrol functions, and although this video provides a good basic rundown, it is not detailed enough for me. For example, I need to learn things like what programs are needed at start-up, as opposed to general instructions like "You can manage your start-up items with this button".

If they ever have the time, I think it would be great if Bill (or now, Bret (?)) could post two detailed videos
on the WinPatrol site explaining all the functions in detail -- for both the free and plus versions. The video
in this link you posted is great, yet not quite detailed enough for a dummy like me.

John
"In an age when mass society has rendered obsolete the qualities of individual courage and independent thought, the oceans of the world still remain, vast and uncluttered, beautiful but unforgiving, awaiting those who will not submit. Their voyages are not an escape, but a fulfillment."

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Offline ky331

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Re: Video Demonstrating WinPatrol
« Reply #2 on: July 24, 2014, 10:03:47 AM »
"For example, I need to learn things like what programs are needed at start-up...

What is needed are any Microsoft programs required by the operating system (most of which won't actually appear in Scotty's standard listing).

Also necessary are any programs by the hardware manufacturer, such as drivers, that allow the PC to recognize and properly use that hardware.   Unfortunately, this varies tremendously ---- it's very much hardware dependent --- that it would be very difficult for BillP &etc. to create such an overall listing.

What should be run at startup are your security programs:  anti-virus and anti-malware (and third-party firewall, if you're using one).   I say "should be", as a PC will boot without these.   And indeed, some people are fearless enough that they choose to surf without an A-V.   But for most people, yes, they should be running an A-V.   Here too, the names (and number) of entries can vary, depending on which security programs you are running.

Beyond these requirements, pretty much the rest of start-up is a matter of user choice, for convenience and productivity:  if running a program at startup helps you better organize and perform your daily chores, it's probably worth it.

What you don't need at startup are the tons of "helpers" and "update checkers" that are thrust upon you by the likes of Java (QuickStarter), RealPlayer, and QuickTime Player.

I believe these are good "rules of thumb".   But to be more specific --- and inclusive --- would necessitate a "book-length" listing.



Offline JDBush61

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Re: Video Demonstrating WinPatrol
« Reply #3 on: July 26, 2014, 12:44:26 AM »
Thanks, ky331.

Your instructions are helpful, and I fundamentally understand. However, unlike most (many?) of the members here, I'm not too computer savvy. Not to belabor this point, but here is an example of how 'tech cripples' like myself approach this conundrum:

You wrote "What is needed are any Microsoft programs required by the operating system (most of which won't actually appear in Scotty's standard listing).

My first thoughts are: 1) And what might those be?, 2) Why don't they appear in Scotty's standard listing?, 3) If I don't know what they are, and Scotty "won't actually" list them, then how do I go about learning that info?, and 4) Is WinPatrol a program that necessitates a PhD in computer science before it can be used properly/safely/effectively?

I ask #4 somewhat tongue in cheek, but I feel quite "stupid" when I read comments from users stating what a great program WinPatrol is and how they wouldn't run their box without it, yet I can't seem to find a detailed "explanation for dummies", even on the WinPatrol website. Or, maybe I missed it somehow. I suppose that that is why I suggested in my reply to Corrine that a detailed company video would really be of assistance to people like me ... and (if I may be so bold to add), if WinPatrol, in fact, is a 'business', then a detailed video would not only help tech-impaired numbnuts like myself learn how to effectively use the product, but also possibly entice us to pay for a "Plus" version.

Seems fairly business 101, to me, anyway.

Statements like the ones shown below somewhat scare me away from using the software. I still have it installed, for now. I'll go back to their website and read some more. Thanks!

"Also necessary are any programs by the hardware manufacturer, such as drivers, that allow the PC to recognize and properly use that hardware.   Unfortunately, this varies tremendously ---- it's very much hardware dependent --- that it would be very difficult for BillP &etc. to create such an overall listing."

I believe these are good "rules of thumb".   But to be more specific --- and inclusive --- would necessitate a "book-length" listing.

"In an age when mass society has rendered obsolete the qualities of individual courage and independent thought, the oceans of the world still remain, vast and uncluttered, beautiful but unforgiving, awaiting those who will not submit. Their voyages are not an escape, but a fulfillment."

~ THE SLOCUM SOCIETY ~

Offline ky331

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Re: Video Demonstrating WinPatrol
« Reply #4 on: July 26, 2014, 11:43:07 AM »
Offhand, I wouldn't know (how many, and the names of) all of the programs/files that Windows uses to launch itself --- when you start-up in Safe Mode, you may actually see a list of these "flying by" quickly.

WinPatrol would NOT want to include all these, lest someone --- naïvely thinking they could "optimize"  their boot-up --- disable them all, only to find out that the system would not boot-up again.

In saying that most of these programs won't appear in Scotty's standard Start-Up listing, I was alluding to the fact that WinPatrol also offers an option on the Start-Up list to "Display Secret Startup Locations (Advanced Mode)".   Checking that box will reveal SOME of the Windows files, such as Explorer.exe and UserInit.Exe.   Windows Explorer (NOT to be confused with Internet Explorer) "manages the Windows Graphical Shell including the Start menu, taskbar, desktop, and File Manager" --- if you were to remove/disable it, you'd kill the Graphical Interface to Windows!

Do you need a Ph.D to use WinPatrol?   No.   But yes, when it comes to deciding which programs you can safely remove from StartUp, you either need to research each one on your own, or rely on competent helpers.

In fact, there are some websites that are dedicated just to the questions of:   What does this program do, and is it safe to remove from StartUp.   My favorite is (was?) "PacMan's Portal", but as I test it now, the link is not resolving.   I don't know if this is a temporary condition, or if something happened to it.   If still available, the link is http://www.pacs-portal.co.uk/startup_search.php

Another good reference list can be found at http://www.hijackfree.com/en/processlist/
Try scrolling through there, and you may be impressed by how long it is!   (Thus, my allusion to "book-length listings".  PacMan's list, if still available, is massively longer.)

I'm sure other members here can offer additional links to their own favorite online databases.

I've chosen to mention these external databases for the sake of those people who use [only] the FREE version of WinPatrol.   For those who have purchased the PLUS version, you can search WinPatrol's own database of common programs:   For example, from its StartUp tab,  move your cursor to select/highlight any program, RIGHT-click, and select PLUS Info.   That will give you a description of the program and its usage, from which YOU can decide what you want to do with it.   Many "common" programs are listed.   But less common ones --- and often those that are specifically OEM-Manufacturer related --- may not be listed.

Is it a simple task to sort through all of this information?   No.   But if you take the time, it should be worth your while.


Offline Corrine

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Re: Video Demonstrating WinPatrol
« Reply #5 on: July 26, 2014, 02:49:05 PM »
@ky331, PacMan's is working for me.  For anyone reading this topic, note that WinPatrol is recommended for managing startup programs.  Scroll down the page at PacMan, Windows startup programs. What are they? Are they required? How can I disable them? to see the section recommending WinPatrol.



**Warning**
When researching files on your computer, it is critical to pay attention to the details.  When in doubt, do a more in-depth search or ask for assistance.

John, one thing to keep in mind, when I request logs for review, they are heavily white listed, leaving out critical files need for the operation of the computer.  If the logs were to show every file on the computer, it would result in needless research.  However, WinPatrol includes in the "Options" tab a couple of tools for assisting in researching.  The easiest to use is the "WinPatrol Log". 

Here is an example of why you need to be thorough in your research and not panic.  From my WinPatrol Log, the item below is shown as disabled.  However, in researching it, someone could panic and think their computer is infected with a trojan.

SysTrayApp

    sttray64.exe                 IDT PC Audio
    Version: 1.0.6276.0         Copyright © 2004 - 2009 IDT, Inc.
    Location: * Disabled * HKLM\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run
    Path: C:\Program Files\IDT\WDM\sttray64.exe
    First Detected by WinPatrol: 10/23/2013 3:38 PM
    Click for Plus Info

Let's look at various sources. 

1.  PacMan's http://www.pacs-portal.co.uk/startup_search.php, typing "sttray64.exe" in the search box shows the following:
Quote
Startup Item or Name    Status    Command or Data    Description    Tested
IDT PC Audio   X   sttray64.exe   Detected by Avira as TR/CoinMiner.JR.82. The file is located in %ProgramFiles%\MSN\MSNCoreFiles\OOBE   No

The first thing that jumps out is that Avira detects the file name it as a trojan, but note the file location.  That is different from what is shown by WinPatrol.

2.  Using a second source, System Lookup, http://www.systemlookup.com/ActiveSetup/4231-sttray64_exe.html, again the same file name but different location, shown as a trojan.

Panicked yet?  What if the location doesn't matter?  What if I have an information stealing trojan on my computer?  Well, stop panicking and continue the research.

3.  Checking the startup database at Bleeping Computer shows the path listed in the WinPatrol Log, http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/startups/sttray64.exe-26989.html provides a different result, which matches the location in the WinPatrol Log:

Quote
This is a valid program but it is not required to run on startup.

This program is not required to start automatically as you can run it when you need to. It is advised that you disable this program so that it does not take up necessary resources. The following information is a brief description of what is known about this file. If you require further assistance for this file, feel free to ask about in the forums.
Name:    SysTrayApp
Filename:    sttray64.exe
Command:    %programfiles%\IDT\WDM\sttray64.exe

Description:
   
Installed with audio chips developed by IDT Audio and customized by the computer manufacturer, this is a tray icon and the 64 bit version of the file.
File Location:    %programfiles%\IDT\WDM\sttray64.exe
Startup Type:    This startup entry is started automatically from a Run, RunOnce, RunServices, or RunServicesOnce entry in the registry.
HijackThis Category:    O4 Entry
Note:    %ProgramFiles% refers to the Program Files folder. The path to this folder is C:\Program Files\ or C:\Program Files (X86)\ depending on whether the version of Windows or the program being installed is 32-bit or 64-bit.
   
4.  Personally, because I have WinPatrol PLUS, all of the above was unnecessary because I was able to Click for Plus Info, which immediately showed the path on my computer, file information and that the file is safe.

Quote
Multiple Programs – STTRAY64.EXE

Sttray64.exe is the system tray application that comes on systems with Sigmatel Audio. It places a file in your system tray that can be used to adjust audio properties. You'll find more information and the latest drivers at http://www.sigmatel.com/. Sttray64.exe also installs with and performs the same functino on systems designed with IDT (Integrated Device Technology) audio. You'll find more information and the latest drivers at http://www.idt.com/?catid=7233908.

Safe



So, what can we learn from this exercise?  First, don't panic if you see something that you aren't sure about.  It isn't that you are a "tech cripple".  Do you really think that I remember all the names and paths to files?  Sure, they become familiar after looking at a lot of logs, but that is something I do regularly and you don't. 

Where WinPatrol Start Up comes in handy is with software programs you have installed.  For example, I use OneNote a lot.  I have a number of different notebooks that I use but I prefer not to use OneNote Clipper so have it disabled by WinPatrol in Start up. 


Take a walk through the "Security Garden" -- Where Everything is Coming up Roses!

Remember - A day without laughter is a day wasted.
May the wind sing to you and the sun rise in your heart.

Offline ky331

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Re: Video Demonstrating WinPatrol
« Reply #6 on: July 26, 2014, 05:49:06 PM »
This response it tangential to the topic under discussion:

Corrine,

I tried accessing PacMan's Portal again, and was still unable to do so.   Given all the security programs I'm running on my systemS, it wasn't obvious from where the problem was stemming, as there were no warning messages... just a failure to resolve.   Via trial-and-error testing, I concluded the fault was in OpenDNS:   With OpenDNS active, even TraceRt was "unable to resolve target system name Pacs-Portal.co.uk" ; but when I disabled OpenDNS, reverting to my ISP's default, everything worked normally.

I have contacted OpenDNS, to see if they had any reason here, or if [presumably] it was just a glitch on their part.   I'll report back when I learn anything.