Author Topic: Half my Tivo files are missing on External Hard Drive- Corrupt? Dying? Saveable?  (Read 24625 times)

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Offline LilBambi

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That drive does seem to be problematic, eh?

The USB3 drives when plugged into a USB3 port on a computer (native or via a card on a desktop computer) is blazing fast compared to even USB2.

For the type of recordings and copying files you do, particularly video, it would be very nice, but eSATA would be even better under those conditions.

If you do not have USB 3 and or eSATA, and the computer is a Desktop, AND if you have a PCI-E SLOT available you could get something like this:

ORICO PNU3539 PCI-E USB 3.0 + eSATA Expansion Card for Desktop - Amazon

Or just a simple PCI eSATA card.
Bambi
AKA Fran
Jim-Fran.com

Offline Corrine

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Yes, there is a safe way to delete sensitive material on a hard drive.  The most popular program that I'm aware of is Eraser.  It can be used to select files and folders, as illustrated at Delete and erase computer traces in Windows

Additional information from the Eraser Discussion Forums:  Getting to know Eraser 6 and [v5/v6] What needs erasure before giving my computer away?.


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Offline lynnalexandra

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Lil Bambi:  funny you should mention that eSata port.  I actually installed one a few years ago.  I marvel now at how I knew to do that since I knew even less then than I know now.  But I was working with Tivo's - and was creating my own external storage device (buying hard drive and antec enclosure).   It seems I was also using some software to make a larger capacity drive that I could put in the Tivo (it's been a long running theme/need - storage capacity for video files).  In that process of doing these various Tivo tasks, including opening up my computer and attaching a hard drive to the mother board (I do recall white-knuckling it and it taking an entire weekend with help from folks on the Tivo forums), I wound up with an extra eSata card and installed it in an unused pci slot.  I think this cavalry drive was attached that way when it was the primary hard drive I used for video files.  Since it's been causing me trouble, I have a new 4TB ext. hard drive that's connected to that eSata port.

My computer is an older dell dimension running XP.  When I get around to replacing it (probably by the winter - don't have time or funds for that project right now), I'm going to be sure to have plenty of USB3 ports.  I knew it was faster, but didn't know it was that much faster.   I plan on a SSD drive.   I think I'll need a dedicated video card as well.  I added a separate video card to this pc last winter (my computer grad did the actual install).  There's a limit to how potent a video card this computer could handle, so I don't think I got a big increase in speed.  I've transferred lots of videos since then, but haven't had much time to edit any.  Maybe that's where I'll see some more difference.  I'm sure that new computer is going to fly compared to what I've got now (although it's been pretty good with a quad-core processer and a ton of things I throw at it simultaneously).

Corrine - thanks for the information about erasing a drive.  I see that eraser should do fine for deleting the files from the hard drives I have now (external and those in my computers).  But when I get my next computer with a SSD, I see that it's not that easy.  Maybe I'll just have to be careful to keep data on a regular drive and just the OS and programs on the SSD.  I'll probably be back here with questions when I get to that point.

Thanks for everything.
Lynn.