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Software & More => Computer Problems, Questions and Solutions! => Topic started by: TNJHubert on August 19, 2018, 08:11:46 PM

Title: I need some help if possible.
Post by: TNJHubert on August 19, 2018, 08:11:46 PM
So I'm running Windows 10 on a Toshiba satellite. I unplugged my laptop from power to clean and now it won't come on. I've included an attachment of the screen I'm getting. Any help is appreciated. I have already tried to go back to a system restore point without any luck, and tried a few commands. It says  "bad system config info"

Edit to add that it won't accept my attachment. It just says shut down or go to advanced options .
Title: Re: I need some help if possible.
Post by: Corrine on August 19, 2018, 09:04:05 PM
Since you can run commands, lets see if Check Disk will help:

-- From an Admin Command Prompt run the following command:  chkdsk /f /r  (Note the spaces)
-- Reply y when prompted if you want to run chkdsk when the computer restarts.

Note: The "f" is for fix and the "r" is to relocate any bad sectors found.
Title: Re: I need some help if possible.
Post by: TNJHubert on August 19, 2018, 09:10:09 PM
Is there a way to get into an admin prompt? Or do I just punch in the command?
Title: Re: I need some help if possible.
Post by: TNJHubert on August 19, 2018, 09:13:11 PM
Since you can run commands, lets see if Check Disk will help:

-- From an Admin Command Prompt run the following command:  chkdsk /f /r  (Note the spaces)
-- Reply y when prompted if you want to run chkdsk when the computer restarts.

Note: The "f" is for fix and the "r" is to relocate any bad sectors found.

Okay so it's set on x:\Windows\system 32

The reply it gave me was "the type of the file system is ntfs. Cannot lock current drive. Windows cannot run disk checking on this volume because it is write protected."
Title: Re: I need some help if possible.
Post by: Digerati on August 20, 2018, 01:36:19 PM
For future reference, you don't need the /f if you use /r.

Typing chkdsk /? lists the various options where you can note,   
Quote
/R                  Locates bad sectors and recovers readable information
                      (implies /F, when /scan not specified).

While "implies" is an odd use of the word, in this case, it means /r includes or entails the functions of /f too.  It does not hurt to include /f when you type in the command, it is just ignored.

Quote
Okay so it's set on x:\Windows\system 32

The reply it gave me was "the type of the file system is ntfs. Cannot lock current drive. Windows cannot run disk checking on this volume because it is write protected."
Did you run Cmd prompt as administrator? Instead of just clicking on Cmd prompt, right click on it, then select "Run as administrator". And remember to select "y" for yes to run at next boot. This is essential to make sure Check Disk can check the drive very early in the boot process, BEFORE the drive is mounted or any hooks get set in it. Note too that chkdsk can take many hours to complete (even a couple days on very large disks) and may appear to be locked up. Just let it run. It will eventually complete.

Title: Re: I need some help if possible.
Post by: satrow on August 20, 2018, 03:18:53 PM
For future reference, you don't need the /f if you use /r.

Typing chkdsk /? lists the various options where you can note,   
Quote
/R                  Locates bad sectors and recovers readable information
                      (implies /F, when /scan not specified).

While "implies" is an odd use of the word, in this case, it means /r includes or entails the functions of /f too.  It does not hurt to include /f when you type in the command, it is just ignored.

Whilst the above might be true of currently supported Windows chkdsk versions, I don't think it applies to some of the older versions - thus some of us still use the boots'n'braces method.
Title: Re: I need some help if possible.
Post by: Digerati on August 20, 2018, 05:17:07 PM
Actually, it does apply - at least as far back as Vista for sure and I am about 99% certain it did with XP too. If you have any of those legacy operating systems, see for yourself. Call up a command prompt and enter: chkdsk /?. For /r, it will say /f is implied.

In other words, /r does the same thing as /f (fixes errors on the disk) plus more (locates bad sectors and recovers readable information). FTR, I know this has cause confusion for many years. There are even MSKB articles that say to use /r and /f. Then there are others that correctly say /f is redundant.

https://askleo.com/chkdsk_what_is_it_and_how_do_i_run_it/
Title: Re: I need some help if possible.
Post by: DR M on August 20, 2018, 05:41:11 PM

The reply it gave me was "the type of the file system is ntfs. Cannot lock current drive. Windows cannot run disk checking on this volume because it is write protected."

A thought (Let the Forum's admins/mods check it first):

What if you use the command with the letter X?

chkdsk /X

From here (https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd637756.aspx):  /X forces the volume to dismount first if necessary (implies /F, which implies /R). 
Title: Re: I need some help if possible.
Post by: Corrine on August 20, 2018, 05:54:33 PM
At Digerati -- seeing as you are my go-to hardware specialist, I'll just say that old habits (plus long-standing notes) are hard to let go.  :)
Title: Re: I need some help if possible.
Post by: Digerati on August 20, 2018, 06:06:02 PM
Quote
At Digerati -- seeing as you are my go-to hardware specialist, I'll just say that old habits (plus long-standing notes) are hard to let go.
And that's fine, Corrine. As noted, it is just ignored any way and does no harm in entering both.
Quote
What if you use the command with the letter X?

chkdsk /X

From here (https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd637756.aspx):  /X forces the volume to dismount first if necessary (implies /F, which implies /R). 
No, that is not the same thing. Look at your reference again.

/r implies /f but not the other way around. That is, /f (nor /x) does NOT imply /r.

The /x switch works on non-boot drives that have been "mounted" without the need to reboot. But on the boot drive, is not needed because chkdsk runs during boot before mounting occurs.

Title: Re: I need some help if possible.
Post by: DR M on August 20, 2018, 06:08:42 PM
Quote
No, that is not the same thing. Look at your reference again.

/r implies /f but not the other way around. That is, /f (nor /x) does NOT imply /r.

MY MISTAKE!!! (Mixed the letters here! r implies f, so again MY MISTAKE!!!)
Title: Re: I need some help if possible.
Post by: Digerati on August 20, 2018, 07:47:38 PM
No problem.
Title: Re: I need some help if possible.
Post by: Corrine on August 20, 2018, 08:51:57 PM
Back to TNJHubert, with apologies that we took your thread semi-off topic.  Please see Digerati's reply to you:

For future reference, you don't need the /f if you use /r.

Typing chkdsk /? lists the various options where you can note,   
Quote
/R                  Locates bad sectors and recovers readable information
                      (implies /F, when /scan not specified).

While "implies" is an odd use of the word, in this case, it means /r includes or entails the functions of /f too.  It does not hurt to include /f when you type in the command, it is just ignored.

Quote
Okay so it's set on x:\Windows\system 32

The reply it gave me was "the type of the file system is ntfs. Cannot lock current drive. Windows cannot run disk checking on this volume because it is write protected."
Did you run Cmd prompt as administrator? Instead of just clicking on Cmd prompt, right click on it, then select "Run as administrator". And remember to select "y" for yes to run at next boot. This is essential to make sure Check Disk can check the drive very early in the boot process, BEFORE the drive is mounted or any hooks get set in it. Note too that chkdsk can take many hours to complete (even a couple days on very large disks) and may appear to be locked up. Just let it run. It will eventually complete.


Title: Re: I need some help if possible.
Post by: TNJHubert on August 20, 2018, 10:25:49 PM
Okay so right clicking doesn't do anything but take me to find prompt, it doesn't say anything about running as an admin. When cmd promp comes up, at the top of the screen it says "not enough memory resources are available to process this command." That's before I even type anything in.
Title: Re: I need some help if possible.
Post by: TNJHubert on August 20, 2018, 10:29:09 PM
I can type in chkdsk, but it won't run f or r. It says there's no bad sectors but in stage 2 it says there's errors detected in the uppercase file.

"Failed to transfer logged messages to the event log with status 50."

Warning /f parameter not specified.

Title: Re: I need some help if possible.
Post by: Corrine on August 21, 2018, 12:58:03 AM
When I type command prompt in the search box, it shows at the top of the results.  That is when I right-click it and select to Run as Administrator.  If you're able to do that, try the following (note the spaces):  DISM.exe /Online /Cleanup-image /Restorehealth

If you are able to run DISM, follow it with SFC /scannow

Note:  You'll know you have an Admin Command Prompt because it will have C:\Windows\system32>. 

Title: Re: I need some help if possible.
Post by: TNJHubert on August 21, 2018, 02:21:20 AM
In the search box? I have no search box. It's just a blue screen. I tried to upload pictures but it won't let me.
Title: Re: I need some help if possible.
Post by: TNJHubert on August 21, 2018, 02:35:41 AM
Okay I got a few
Title: Re: I need some help if possible.
Post by: Digerati on August 21, 2018, 01:37:51 PM
Quote
In the search box? I have no search box. It's just a blue screen. I tried to upload pictures but it won't let me.
Let's make sure we are all on the same page. I am not sure we are. There are many ways to get to a search box in Windows 10 and sadly, it is often not clear what you end up with is a "search box".

So try this.
Now you should see the Command Prompt window and from here you should be able to run chkdsk /r (note the space after the k) or the commands Corrine suggested.
If you still get that error, you may have to start over with these steps, but in Safe Mode (https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/12376/windows-10-start-your-pc-in-safe-mode).

Title: Re: I need some help if possible.
Post by: TNJHubert on August 21, 2018, 09:49:58 PM
We are definitely not on the same page. I'm currently using my cell phone. My computer is trying to repair itself. It's a blue screen like the one I've attached. The only option I have is to shut down or advanced options. That's it.
Title: Re: I need some help if possible.
Post by: Corrine on August 21, 2018, 10:16:16 PM
Click on "Advanced options" and select "Diagnose".  Write down what is reported.  For example, my old desktop got to that stage on Sunday.  It wouldn't complete chkdsk, a hard restart would bring it right back to chkdsk and again it wouldn't complete.  The diagnoses for everything was fine except the hard drive.  As a result, a friend is in the process of replacing the hard drive for me.
Title: Re: I need some help if possible.
Post by: TNJHubert on August 21, 2018, 10:28:44 PM
It says it was diagnosing then it says

"Automatic repair couldn't repair your pc
Press "advanced options" to try to repair your pc or "shut down" to turn off your pc.
Log file: d:\Windows\system32\logfiles\srt\srttrail.txt
Title: Re: I need some help if possible.
Post by: techie on August 22, 2018, 12:37:18 AM
I understand that you aren't booting into Windows, your only getting the option to do an automatic repair, on startup and it fails.You have to go into the advanced options as it is telling you to do. If you restart it then it will just go through the same cycle and tell you automatic repair failed.

Once you get to advance option, you can try a few different things. I'm not going to sit and retype it when it's already available online. Go here and follow the instructions. I would try repairing the master boot record first as there instructions go. A reset is your last option.

https://www.thewindowsclub.com/automatic-repair-couldnt-repair-pc

 
Title: Re: I need some help if possible.
Post by: v_v on August 22, 2018, 12:59:56 AM
I do not have anything constructive to contribute to this discussion, except to say that I had the exact same experience this past Saturday evening 8-18-2018, with Windows 10 on an Acer laptop.  So TNJHubert, you are not alone.

All of the screens that TNJHubert has listed appeared on my laptop.  While I am not a technician nor a tech wizard I am also not a complete novice either.  I went through all of the options that Windows 10 presented on every page including the Advanced Options, twice!  At least in my case Windows 10 could not repair itself, it could find no restore point, and there were no command prompts available nor any "safe mode" or chkdsk  options.  The choices were extremely limited.  It did not remind me of any of my trouble-shooting experiences with Windows 95 through XP.  Then finally it said that I could try resetting the computer --- starting from scratch/zero with only my personal files retained --- or I could try reinstalling Windows 10 through some sort of external media.  I did not have any external source of Windows 10 so eventually I had to settle on resetting the computer.  I am still in the process of re-installing everything that was on the computer at the time of the blow-up, and that reinstallation will take a while!  (Sigh)

I do not know what to attribute all of this to.  I do know that earlier that day the Acer computer went through the latest Windows 10 update (I do not use that computer on a daily basis; I only update it on the weekends).  But whether that update had anything to do with the blow-up I do not know.

Thank goodness my main and older computer runs on a different Windows operating system that has been faithful and consistent even if non-supported!
Title: Re: I need some help if possible.
Post by: TNJHubert on August 22, 2018, 10:42:58 AM
Thanks for the input. I will try these suggestions when I get home from work.
Title: Re: I need some help if possible.
Post by: techie on August 22, 2018, 02:56:27 PM
If you do have to run a reset, it will keep your personal files, but like v_v said it will remove a bunch of 3rd party programs, to even include Office if it is installed. It will take some time to reinstall the programs.

That is why reset is considered the last option, but sometimes the only option that works. The main thing about it you keep all of your documents, pictures, music, etc.
Title: Re: I need some help if possible.
Post by: TNJHubert on August 22, 2018, 10:37:28 PM
Okay so I tried what techie said with no luck. I also tried resetting the computer and it won't even do that.
Title: Re: I need some help if possible.
Post by: TNJHubert on August 22, 2018, 10:41:18 PM
This is what I get when doing fix boot.
Title: Re: I need some help if possible.
Post by: v_v on August 23, 2018, 10:37:51 PM
Wow, that looks really bad --- but wait for someone else who has more knowledge than I.

In the meantime what was your source of Windows 10?  Do you have it on any external media that you can use to re-install it?

If you upgraded from a earlier version of Windows, do you still have any external media with that earlier version?  The following is just a thought and I do not know if it is reliable:  perhaps if all else fails and you do not have an external source of Windows 10 then you might be able to re-install that earlier version and then go through the Windows upgrade process again.  But before I did anything like that I would probably check in with Microsoft just to make sure that that is possible.

Another thought might be to contact Microsoft about this failure of Windows 10 to see if they have a solution.

v_v
Title: Re: I need some help if possible.
Post by: TNJHubert on August 23, 2018, 10:53:44 PM
So I purchased the laptop years ago with xp on it and didn't think to purchase the install disk. Last year or the year before they we're offering a free upgrade to windows 10 so I did that. I unplugged the laptop the other day to put it away and clean and this is the result.
Title: Re: I need some help if possible.
Post by: plodr on August 24, 2018, 12:58:25 PM
Total recognized Windows installations: 0. That doesn't look good.

But everything is pointing to drive X rather than C. You might have a perfectly good Windows installation on drive C.

As far as a"free" upgrade to Windows 10, that was only for people running Windows 7 or 8.1, not XP. So that might also contribute to the problem.
Title: Re: I need some help if possible.
Post by: Corrine on August 24, 2018, 02:16:32 PM
Yes, I have heard of Windows XP devices being able to run Windows 10.  I have two Windows Vista PCs that are successfully running Windows 10, having upgraded them both first to Windows 7 and then the free upgrade to Windows 10.  However, as plodr said, Window XP machines were not eligible for the free upgrade. 

That aside, a the average lifespan of a well maintained laptop is 3-5 years so it very likely that it has out-lived its life.
Title: Re: I need some help if possible.
Post by: TNJHubert on August 24, 2018, 02:40:25 PM
I've had it for probably 6+ years. Is there anyway to fix it? Or at least salvage the photos?
Title: Re: I need some help if possible.
Post by: TNJHubert on August 24, 2018, 02:41:35 PM
Total recognized Windows installations: 0. That doesn't look good.

But everything is pointing to drive X rather than C. You might have a perfectly good Windows installation on drive C.

As far as a"free" upgrade to Windows 10, that was only for people running Windows 7 or 8.1, not XP. So that might also contribute to the problem.

Maybe it was windows 7. I don't remember
Title: Re: I need some help if possible.
Post by: techie on August 24, 2018, 08:00:50 PM
I went back at looked at what you said again, 6 years old unhooked it to clean it. Now it won't startup. I should have thought about the battery. Is the battery good? Did you remove the battery when you were cleaning it? The laptop button battery is probably bad, it saves the bios settings, not a problem unless you unplug the power, and battery is bad or removed.

If this is the case then the bios settings were probably lost. That means the time and date are wrong. It probably isn't pointing correcting to the hard drive when it boots.  The laptop may be a legacy bios or it could have been UEFI secure boot. If it was setup for UEFI boot and it reverted back to legacy, the system will not startup correctly or vice versa, setup for legacy and reverted to UEFI. The bios will show you the CPU, memory, and drives installed.
It could have been setup as AHCI drive as well. Any of these settings not correct will keep it from booting up. Win 10 will only see it as boot problem and try to fix it.

To check your bios setting it is probably the F2 key as soon as the splash screen starts. It could as well be F1, Delete, or escape key.

You also should have a F12 option that allows you to pick which drive it is booting into. This also is where you would find the factory recovery option. I don't recommend it unless you are willing to lose everything you have. It would be a absolute, I don't have any option. A person with a little knowledge could remove the hard drive and connect it to another computer with a USB adapter cable connection and copy most files off if it isn't completely dead.

I think it's more of a bios setting than a bad drive, if it was working fine until you disconnected it to clean it. You may have to try the different settings. If you are lucky it may have a default option. You will have to check the date and time as well as the bootup option.
Title: Re: I need some help if possible.
Post by: techie on August 24, 2018, 08:09:46 PM
This gets a little bit technical, but explains the two different options.

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-hardware/manufacture/desktop/boot-to-uefi-mode-or-legacy-bios-mode

https://www.howtogeek.com/56958/htg-explains-how-uefi-will-replace-the-bios/
Title: Re: I need some help if possible.
Post by: v_v on August 24, 2018, 10:42:42 PM
TNJHubert,

I think techie's suggestions concerning first the battery and then either the UEFI or the BIOS are a real good start.

Also as he suggests

Quote
A person with a little knowledge could remove the hard drive and connect it to another computer with a USB adapter cable connection and copy most files off if it isn't completely dead.

This would be a strong backup option if everything else fails.  Like he said chances are the drive is still in decent shape but that something may have gone awry when you unplugged everything.

In support of plodr's thought I had wondered about the "x:" drive too (listed on your last posted screen).  As she said there might be a valid Windows installation on your C: drive, even though that same posted screen stated "Scanning all disks for Windows installations."  Maybe it is not recognizing the "C:" drive and that might related to the loss of BIOS settings as techie suggested.

With all of this in mind give us some technical details.  You mentioned a "Toshiba satellite" in your first post.  Do you have or know the model number and what kind of configuration you had (chips, memory size, size of hard drive, etc).  This would help with finding manufacturer manuals and data that might help the situation, if none of the previous suggestions work.

It is not time to give up just yet as long as the drive is still in decent shape.

v_v
Title: Re: I need some help if possible.
Post by: TNJHubert on August 24, 2018, 11:04:57 PM
I went back at looked at what you said again, 6 years old unhooked it to clean it. Now it won't startup. I should have thought about the battery. Is the battery good? Did you remove the battery when you were cleaning it? The laptop button battery is probably bad, it saves the bios settings, not a problem unless you unplug the power, and battery is bad or removed.

If this is the case then the bios settings were probably lost. That means the time and date are wrong. It probably isn't pointing correcting to the hard drive when it boots.  The laptop may be a legacy bios or it could have been UEFI secure boot. If it was setup for UEFI boot and it reverted back to legacy, the system will not startup correctly or vice versa, setup for legacy and reverted to UEFI. The bios will show you the CPU, memory, and drives installed.
It could have been setup as AHCI drive as well. Any of these settings not correct will keep it from booting up. Win 10 will only see it as boot problem and try to fix it.

To check your bios setting it is probably the F2 key as soon as the splash screen starts. It could as well be F1, Delete, or escape key.

You also should have a F12 option that allows you to pick which drive it is booting into. This also is where you would find the factory recovery option. I don't recommend it unless you are willing to lose everything you have. It would be a absolute, I don't have any option. A person with a little knowledge could remove the hard drive and connect it to another computer with a USB adapter cable connection and copy most files off if it isn't completely dead.

I think it's more of a bios setting than a bad drive, if it was working fine until you disconnected it to clean it. You may have to try the different settings. If you are lucky it may have a default option. You will have to check the date and time as well as the bootup option.

I unplugged it to clean the house, not the laptop haha. Anyway, the battery is actually completely shot. You have to leave it plugged in to stay on longer than 30 minutes.
Title: Re: I need some help if possible.
Post by: TNJHubert on August 24, 2018, 11:14:38 PM
I can't get anything with pressing any of the f keys, escape etc. any other ideas?
Title: Re: I need some help if possible.
Post by: TNJHubert on August 24, 2018, 11:21:29 PM
So I found this.... Any help?
Title: Re: I need some help if possible.
Post by: techie on August 25, 2018, 03:32:31 PM
The recovery is where you should be able to keep everything personal, but lose your installed programs probably.
This was a area we were wanting you to get into previously. If you reset it, the problem may still exist if the bios settings are wrong. The screen and repair options, shows that the Win 10 OS is installed.

Check your bios settings first, then if it doesn't boot up, try the safe mode boot option, to see if boots into WIN 10 or you can try safe mode boot before.

This explains a little better from Toshiba, how to get into the bios settings.

https://support.toshiba.com/support/viewContentDetail?soid=627009
Title: Re: I need some help if possible.
Post by: DR M on August 26, 2018, 04:53:08 PM
Perhaps this helps (perhaps not):

I also tried start the computer in command prompt. This is what I also get:

x:\windows\system32

No command could run from here (chkdsk /r etc.)

From How To Start Windows 10 In Command Prompt (https://www.tomshardware.com/news/how-to-start-windows-10-command-prompt,36681.html):

Quote
X:Sources directory is a temporary container that is created when you start Windows 10 externally. However, to execute main commands, it is important to switch to the system drive which in most cases is D: when the PC is booted externally, and C: when booted normally.

So by changing the drive, I was able to run chkdsk utility.

D: and then enter
chkdsk /r
Title: Re: I need some help if possible.
Post by: TNJHubert on August 26, 2018, 09:42:27 PM
Perhaps this helps (perhaps not):

I also tried start the computer in command prompt. This is what I also get:

x:\windows\system32

No command could run from here (chkdsk /r etc.)

From How To Start Windows 10 In Command Prompt (https://www.tomshardware.com/news/how-to-start-windows-10-command-prompt,36681.html):

Quote
X:Sources directory is a temporary container that is created when you start Windows 10 externally. However, to execute main commands, it is important to switch to the system drive which in most cases is D: when the PC is booted externally, and C: when booted normally.

So by changing the drive, I was able to run chkdsk utility.

D: and then enter
chkdsk /r

Tried this and now it's stuck. It says the type of the file system is nfts. Cannot lock current drive
Title: Re: I need some help if possible.
Post by: TNJHubert on August 26, 2018, 09:44:44 PM
TNJHubert,

I think techie's suggestions concerning first the battery and then either the UEFI or the BIOS are a real good start.

Also as he suggests

Quote
A person with a little knowledge could remove the hard drive and connect it to another computer with a USB adapter cable connection and copy most files off if it isn't completely dead.

This would be a strong backup option if everything else fails.  Like he said chances are the drive is still in decent shape but that something may have gone awry when you unplugged everything.

In support of plodr's thought I had wondered about the "x:" drive too (listed on your last posted screen).  As she said there might be a valid Windows installation on your C: drive, even though that same posted screen stated "Scanning all disks for Windows installations."  Maybe it is not recognizing the "C:" drive and that might related to the loss of BIOS settings as techie suggested.

With all of this in mind give us some technical details.  You mentioned a "Toshiba satellite" in your first post.  Do you have or know the model number and what kind of configuration you had (chips, memory size, size of hard drive, etc).  This would help with finding manufacturer manuals and data that might help the situation, if none of the previous suggestions work.

It is not time to give up just yet as long as the drive is still in decent shape.

v_v

It's a Satellite L755-S5246, that's all I remember
Title: Re: I need some help if possible.
Post by: TNJHubert on August 26, 2018, 09:46:10 PM
Trying any of the f keys, or any key for that matter makes my computer beep really loud and does nothing
Title: Re: I need some help if possible.
Post by: DR M on August 26, 2018, 09:57:20 PM
What do you mean it stuck after trying the above? What is showing after cannot lock the current drive?
Title: Re: I need some help if possible.
Post by: TNJHubert on August 27, 2018, 12:09:00 AM
It shows nothing and will not allow me to do anything, like it freezes
Title: Re: I need some help if possible.
Post by: DR M on August 27, 2018, 07:50:06 AM
It shows nothing and will not allow me to do anything, like it freezes

After

D: and then enter
chkdsk /r

I also get the same message with you (The disk is NTFS, and cannot lock the current drive), BUT following with the message in the attachment, which talks about the need of dismounting the volume first.

Anyway, I think that the d: is necessary for getting into your Windows drive. Perhaps after doing this (d: and enter) you can try again what techie told to you in reply 22 (https://www.landzdown.com/computer-problems-questions-and-solutions!/i-need-some-help-if-possible/msg199711/#msg199711).



Title: Re: I need some help if possible.
Post by: v_v on August 27, 2018, 11:53:49 PM
TNJHubert,

From a search on "Toshiba Satellite L755-S5246 manual" here are some of the specifications of the computer.


--------------------

Satellite L755 Detailed Product Specification

Model Name: L755-S5246 Part Number: PSK1WU-06T004 UPC: 883974831654


Operating System

Genuine Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit


Processor and Graphics

Intel ® Pentium B940 processor
2.0 GHz, 2MB cache
Mobile Intel ® HM65 Express Chipset
Mobile Intel ® HD graphics with 64MB-1696MB shared graphics memory


Memory

Configured with 4GB DDR3 1333MHz (max 8GB)
2 main memory slots. Both slots occupied.


Storage Drive

500GB (5400 RPM); Serial ATA hard disk drive

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So chances are that you upgraded from a Windows 7 system to Windows 10.  If so it might be that the Windows 7 system is still available in some hidden partition.  Maybe more knowledgeable people could clarify this.  But for the moment resorting to that would be a last step because if it is even available it would probably wipe out everything on your disk drive for a complete start over, and you indicated that you are trying to save some personal files.


 1.  Can you still get to the Startup Settings screens that you posted in Reply #39?

 2.  If so, what happens when try option 4 which is "Enable Safe Mode?"

 3.  From the same screens what happens when you try option 6, "Enable Safe Mode with Command Prompt?"

 4.  Depending on what your answers are to the above, if you can get back to a command prompt (especially with safe mode, but even without it if not otherwise possible), what happens if you type at the command prompt: "c:"? (Do not type the quotation marks!)

 5.  If you can get to the "c:" prompt (and not the "x:" prompt), what happens if you type "dir /p" (there is a space between the "dir" and the "/p"); if this works it should list the contents of the "c:" drive one screen at at time; you will be allowed to press any key to pull up another screen of data until all the contents of the directory have been listed; if all of this works, the take pictures of each screen and post them at Landzdown so that we can see what is available.

 6.  Also if you can get to the "c:" drive try going through the steps at the webpage that techie posted in Reply # 22:  " https://www.thewindowsclub.com/automatic-repair-couldnt-repair-pc ".

 7.  If the above "get to c: drive" steps (4-6) do not work, then try the same steps 4-6 using "d:" instead of "c:".

 8.  Since you posted info in your Reply # 21 that indicated "Log file: d:\Windows\system32\logfiles\srt\srttrail.txt" it might be helpful to try to get to this file and post the contents; so if all of the above has not moved things along further, then if you can get to the "d:" prompt, then type "cd windows", then "cd system32", then "cd logfiles", then "cd srt", then "type srttrail.txt | more"; this last command should list the contents of the file in a screen by screen manner that you can take pictures of and post here (if it is not excessively long); if you can get to the "d:" prompt you might also be able to just type "type d:\Windows\system32\logfiles\srt\srttrail.txt | more" as a short cut instead of going through all of the "cd" steps; the "|" key should be the shift of the "\" key which is probably near the backspace key.

To do the steps listed at the webpage that techie posted in Reply # 22 and that DR M mentioned you might need to try a hard re-booting of the computer, maybe even more than once.

Let us know of the results.

v_v
Title: Re: I need some help if possible.
Post by: techie on August 28, 2018, 01:28:42 PM
I don't the answer, you have to hit F2 repeatedly as soon as you see the Toshiba Splash screen, don't hold F2 down. That should get you into the bios. If it doesn't get you into the bios and tries to boot, you have to turn it off and try again. Once there you need to make sure the date and time is correct. It should have a option to set it to default settings. After you do that hit esc and save when prompted, then exit.

If it fails to boot after that and you are given the advanced option for Windows 10 I would just do the reset at this point and you will be able to keep your personal files, pictures, etc. You will have to reinstall other third party programs, like anti-virus or even Microsoft Office.

Your computer does have a factory reset to WIN 7 built in, but I don't want to go there. If you use it you will lose everything that you have on the computer.

The laptop battery replacement is less than twenty dollars. I would think about a new one if you are going to keep the Laptop.
Title: Re: I need some help if possible.
Post by: techie on August 28, 2018, 01:45:42 PM
One additional thing, you have to be on the c drive prompt before you can run the check disk command. If you are on the X:\ then you need to type C:\ and then enter. You should then have the C drive prompt which is where the commands like check disk or other commands are run from.

You really need to get into the advanced repair options. You can try command safe mode command prompt and type in the commands, or safe mode without networking boot. If this doesn't work, then you need to try a recovery of Windows 10. If that fails, then you are reaching a point that you may need to take it to someone to have it fixed.
I have no other ideas.