Author Topic: Help save a fellow member some money.  (Read 24431 times)

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Offline GR@PH;<'S

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Help save a fellow member some money.
« on: March 21, 2006, 10:33:54 AM »
This topic is for you to post us your tips that can save fellow a member some money.

Such as how to stop your bathroom mirror misting up by using a small amount of shaving Foam/Gel
by smearing it over the mirror then buff it off job done.
then the next time you have a Wash / Bath / Shower , No misting .

Thus saving money on expensive demisters.

(Note any post not containing  a tip may be moved or removed)

GR@PH;<'S   :breakkie:
press Enter then have a Brandy then if the problem is still there have another Brandy
Q: does it work
A: It does seem to for a few hours at least.

Offline Corrine

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Re: Help save a fellow member some money.
« Reply #1 on: March 21, 2006, 01:12:07 PM »
Burning a candle while showering also seems to prevent the mirror from fogging. 


Take a walk through the "Security Garden" -- Where Everything is Coming up Roses!

Remember - A day without laughter is a day wasted.
May the wind sing to you and the sun rise in your heart.

Offline Ripley

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Re: Help save a fellow member some money.
« Reply #2 on: March 22, 2006, 01:17:38 AM »
Burning a candle while showering also seems to prevent the mirror from fogging. 

Such as how to stop your bathroom mirror misting up by using a small amount of shaving Foam/Gel
by smearing it over the mirror then buff it off job done.
then the next time you have a Wash / Bath / Shower , No misting .

Thus saving money on expensive demisters.

I guess I'm gonna have to try some experiments...I've been spending WAY too much  :2cents:  on demisters!

I did not know these ideas for the bathroom!

But I like anything that"ll save  :2cents:  or energy. like wiping, wiping, wiping, off the bathroom mirror!

For gardeners, SAVE your sawdust if you have a workshop!  They say sawdust, esp pine lumber, when mulched in with your garden soil will not only help hold moisture but provide much needed nutrition.  But be careful about sawdust from lumber that has been chemically treated.

Offline philsharp

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Re: Help save a fellow member some money.
« Reply #3 on: March 22, 2006, 02:23:28 AM »

To deodorize a room leave a open container filled with vinegar in any hidden nook or cranny. Will get rid of smells the first overnight then continue to do its work until evaporated .Much much cheaper than aerosols and a non-irritant for sensitive noses!!

Offline babyoh

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Re: Help save a fellow member some money.
« Reply #4 on: March 22, 2006, 03:01:52 AM »
 :rose: what a GREAT topic.
i dodn't know ANY of this stuff...
 :thumbsup:

Offline Skittles

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Re: Help save a fellow member some money.
« Reply #5 on: March 22, 2006, 02:16:53 PM »
Okay you want household tips?  I have them!  I have been collecting such tips for years now.  Get ready...this is gonna be long!  lol

Before for your summer vacation, thoroughly soak and feed your houseplants then cluster them together in an empty bathtub or child’s swimming pool.

Set in a sunny location or provide your plants with artificial lighting while you are away.

Cover them completely with a lightweight tent of clear plastic and tightly seal it with tape on all sides. No more water necessary.

This is supposed to work for up to two weeks.

Offline Skittles

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Re: Help save a fellow member some money.
« Reply #6 on: March 22, 2006, 02:23:47 PM »
 am not real sure if I fully understand this tip....in regards to when to apply the water.....but it sounds good. hehehe

Fire ant extinguisher. In many areas of the country fire ants are a very serious problem. The hills they build are difficult to get rid of, they attack very quickly, and their sting burns for a long time. Instead of spraying with poisonous, expensive pesticides just pour enough uncooked grits over the hill to completely cover it and then water the hill very well. The ants eat the grits and when the water is applied they “swell up” and die. It works great and leaves no poisons in the grass for your children and pets to be exposed to.

BTW........most of all of these tips are brought to you by EverydayCheapskate by Mary Hunt http://www.cheapskatemonthly.com/member_tips.asp


Offline Skittles

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Re: Help save a fellow member some money.
« Reply #7 on: March 22, 2006, 02:24:54 PM »
homemade hair spray

Pour two cups of water into a small saucepan. Chop two lemons and add to the water. Bring to a boil, cover and simmer until lemons are quite soft (at least 30 minutes). Cool mixture and strain through cheesecloth (the foot portion of pantyhose works well if you don’t have cheesecloth). Pour into a spray bottle that produces a very find spray and add 1 tablespoon vodka or rubbing alcohol. Shake mixture. Dilute with water if too sticky.

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Offline Skittles

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Re: Help save a fellow member some money.
« Reply #8 on: March 22, 2006, 02:27:20 PM »
 homemade cleaner for plastic eyeglass lenses that won't scratch or harm non-glare coating.

Bring 1/2 cup of water to a boil and allow to cool. Pour it into a small, refillable spray bottle. Add 1 teaspoon white vinegar and a single drop of liquid dish soap. Shake gently to mix. I use this on eyeglass lenses, my computer screen, mirrors and other glass items with great results. Boiling the water first precipitates any calcium and minerals it contains. It's the stuff that builds up in the bottom of your teakettle. As for this cleaner not harming non-glare coatings, I cannot guarantee that because there are so many types of coatings and lens materials out there. My best advice is to always test something like this on the edge or in an inconspicuous place first, just to make sure.

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Offline Skittles

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Re: Help save a fellow member some money.
« Reply #9 on: March 22, 2006, 02:28:12 PM »
I found these tips on cleaning the different kinds of wood floors.

written by Mary Hunt from cheapskatemonthly   http://www.cheapskatemonthly.com/member_tips.asp



Cleaning Wood Floors 101

If there’s one thing I’ve learned in searching for the answer to the simple question, “How should I clean my wood floors?” this is it: There is no simple answer.

Naively I assumed that wood in its simplest form has been standing out in the rain since the beginning of time without the slightest hint of water damage. Surely a regular scrub with a bucket of hot soapy water would be the way to go. Boy, was I wrong!

Laminate wood. Laminates like Pergo and Wilsonart are dense fiberboard on the inside covered with a paper pattern layer sealed under high pressure with a plastic-like substance. Damp mop for routine maintenance but do not use soaps or detergents on laminates because they may dull the floor. For heavy cleaning, use a mixture of household vinegar and water (1-cup vinegar to 1-gallon warm water) or household ammonia and water (1/2 cup ammonia to 1-gallon warm water). Difficult spots like nail polish, markers, tar and cigarette burns can be removed with acetone or nail polish remover. Laminate floors must never be waxed, polished, sanded or refinished.

Engineered wood. Plywood with a thin veneer of finished solid wood on top, engineered wood flooring has superior strength to wood planks and is the most popular type of wood floor these days.

There are mainly three types of finishes for wood floors: varnish/shellac, penetrating seal (wax) or a surface finish (urethane). To clean and protect your considerable investment, you need to know how your floors were finished. Unless your floors are quite old, a shellac finish is unlikely. If you don’t know which type of finish you have, try smudging the finish with a finger or scraping the finish with a fingernail or sharp instrument in a hidden area or corner of the room. If the smudge is noticeable or no clear finish material is scraped up, follow the guideline for penetrating sealer.

Regardless of the finish, you should never use vinyl or tile floor cleaners on wood. Also you should avoid using a wet mop on wood floors. Puddles of water will damage and discolor the wood.

Surface finished wood. Finished with Polyurethane, Swedish finish, or some kind of water-based urethane, surface-finished wood has a very hard water-resistant finish. You can use a slightly damp mop, provided the mop or cloth is wrung out so well it is nearly dry. Never use vinegar or ammonia on a surface finished floor as either will irreversibly dull the finish. For heavy cleaning of surface-finished woods you must use a cleaning product made specifically for surface-finished wood floors, most of which are water-based. Never apply wax to a surface-finished floor.

Penetrating seals. Floors finished with a penetrating seal typically have a wax coating that gives the wood a soft luster. If your floor has a wax finish, do not clean it with a water-based cleaning liquid. You need to use a solvent-based wax product designed for use on sealed wood floors.

Preventive maintenance. The cheapest way to care for wood floors is to make sure dirt never gets embedded in the first place. That means vacuuming and dust mopping at least weekly. Place doormats at every entrance to keep sand, grit and dirt from being tracked in. And when spills occur, clean them up immediately using a towel dipped in warm water and wrung out until it is nearly dry. Follow immediately with a dry towel to dry and buff the area.

Offline Skittles

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Re: Help save a fellow member some money.
« Reply #10 on: March 22, 2006, 02:31:17 PM »
Soak cycle on the go. If your infant or toddler occasionally soils a garment while you are away from home, try this trick to keep the stain from setting.

Put two tablespoons of powdered Dreft (or your detergent of choice) and one tablespoon of Biz in a gallon size zip-type bag and keep it in your diaper bag.

If a garment is soiled, simply put the garment in the bag, add water, seal the bag and shake to mix everything together. When you get home, the garment has been presoaked and is ready to wash. Holly L. California

Again, that was in the achives of the cheapskatemonthly.

Offline Skittles

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Re: Help save a fellow member some money.
« Reply #11 on: March 22, 2006, 02:33:49 PM »
Dishwasherology from Mary Hunt at Everyday Cheapskate.  http://www.cheapskatemonthly.com/member_tips.asp

Today I would like to offer my personal thanks to Josephine Cochrane of Illinois. I’d like to, but I can’t. She’s been dead for more than a century. But if I could I’d also tell her she’s the smartest woman in the world for inventing the dishwasher. Personally, I’d give up just about anything but my dishwasher.

I admit to being a bit of a snob when it comes to properly washed dishes, glassware and utensils. If they come out spotted, feel rough to the touch or have a cloudy appearance I’m not happy. Given the big smile on my face, you can rest assured that I have a few tricks and tips up my cheapskate sleeve.

Water temperature. Water should enter the dishwasher at 140 F. If it is hotter you run the risk of permanently etching the glasses and flatware; cooler will produce disappointing results. Hint: Fill a container with the hottest water from your tap. Check the temperature with a meat thermometer then adjust your water heater accordingly.

Dishwashing detergent. It’s difficult to beat the Cascade lineup of products, but Costco’s and Wal-mart’s store brands come pretty darn close. I use Costco’s Kirkland brand with great results. However, when Cascade Complete (my absolute favorite) is on sale and I have a coupon, I can beat even Costco’s price. Hint: Test store brands and if you are not satisfied, return the product for a refund.

Don’t rinse. Scrape off the chunks of food, but never pre-rinse items for the dishwasher. Automatic dishwasher detergent is highly alkaline and needs the acidity of the food to reach optimum cleaning action. Besides, rinsing wastes time, energy and water.

Detergent substitute. I’ve done a lot of experimenting but have not found a reasonable long-term substitute for dishwasher detergent. In a pinch I’ve used a 50/50 mix of borax and baking soda with acceptable results. But on a regular basis it does not produce good results. Hint: Experiment with stretching your detergent by mixing it with the baking soda and borax solution above.

Hard water. Go to your water company’s website and click on “water quality” or make a phone call. Say you want to know the hardness rating of your water in “grains per gallon” or gpg.

Correct amount. More than likely you’re dumping money down the drain by using way too much detergent. You need only 1 to 4 tablespoons depending on the hardness of your water: 0-3 grains hardness, 1 tablespoon; 4-6 grains, 2 tablespoons; 7-9 grains, 3 tablespoons and 10-12 grains, 4 tablespoons. If your water, like mine, is over 12 grains hard (I deal with 14 gpg), you need to fill both dispenser cups completely. Caution: More is not better. Using more detergent than required according to your water hardness may permanently etch your glasses and flatware.

Rinse agent. A rinse additive like Jet-Dry improves the sheeting action of water and leaves dishes sparkling clear, but it can be pricey. Hint: White vinegar is a reasonable substitute. Fill your rinse additive dispenser with straight white vinegar. Occasionally toss in a cup of white vinegar to the last rinse to keep everything looking good!

Save water. It takes between 6-10 gallons of water to run your dishwasher compared to 9-24 gallons you would consume doing them by hand. So give yourself a break and let your dishwasher do the job Josephine intended for it to do!


Dishwasher Gels Can Turn Into Sticky Situations

Dear Mary,
I read your article about dishwashers and enjoyed it. I was puzzled however by your warning against using gel-type detergents. I switched to gels awhile ago because I got tired of my powder getting wet, clumping up and not spilling out and dissolving during the washing cycle. Thanks so much for encouraging me to live below my means and to be content in the process. Nell M., email

Dear Nell,
I’ve heard from several appliance repair professionals who warn that gel detergents seem to clog the pipes. Jim, the virtual repairman at www.repair2000.com agrees. In fact Jim calls gels the scum of the earth! They create more problems than they resolve. Gels contain chlorine bleach (dissolves rubber seals). Gels tend to cloud glassware, leaving a whitish film. Gels never really rinse off the interior tub. Gels clog the detergent dispenser, making it release late or not at all. And if that’s not enough, gels don`t work well in hard water.

Powders, while they work much better, have their own problems as you’ve discovered. Powders pick up moisture and can become caked or lumpy. Jim says to buy only the quantity you will use up in two weeks. Open the package carefully to avoid removing any more of the outer wrap than is necessary, and always reclose the package tightly. Store in a cool, dry place (not under the sink) to assure freshness and pourability.

******************************************

I personally emailed Mary Hunt, about my problem with cloudy glasses constantly. We have a real problem with lime here, in our water.

This is what she wrote back to me.

Hi Amy,

Throwing a cup of white vinegar in during the last rinse will help. But the problem is likely that you are not using hot enough water. It must be 140 degrees from the first moment it enters the dishwasher. (Set your water heater as hot as it will go to reach that level if your dishwasher does not have its own built in water heater) then run the tap closest to the machine to get the hot water nice and hot before you turn on the machine. If you have small children or elderly in your home you have to be very careful with the water that hot. It could scald them.

And you have to use the right amount of determined by the hardness (grains) of your water. You can't estimate and come out right. And I would suggest you try Cascade Complete detergent. And do NOT rinse the dishes first. Just scrape. The detergent is formulated to require the acid in foods to start the chemical reactions to get the best results. I know all of this might sound like dishwasher voodoo ... but it all adds up and makes a big difference.

Good luck ... I know the vinegar will help to get things rolling. But you probably don't want to do that every time you wash the dishes.

Mary

Offline Skittles

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Re: Help save a fellow member some money.
« Reply #12 on: March 22, 2006, 02:37:33 PM »
Clean your copper pans with ketchup.  Works like a charm...I have done this myself.

Offline Skittles

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Uses for Used Coffee Grounds
« Reply #13 on: March 22, 2006, 02:51:29 PM »
I found this, and thought I would share it with all of you here.

http://frugalliving.about.com/od/uncommonuses/a/coffeegrounds.htm

Don't waste your coffee grounds!

Coffee is the number one drink in the USA and other parts of the world. Do you drink it? And then put your coffee grounds in the trash? Shame on you.

A reader asked if I knew of any good uses for used coffee grounds. The question - or I should say, the answer - took me by surprise, because I can find a use for just about any garbage, but coffee grounds? Other than composting them, I was at a loss.

I'm happy to say that after some intense research and a little experimentation, I now have a much better answer!

Yard, garden, and the outdoors offer a lot of opportunities to use coffee grounds:

1. Compost them, of course (along with the coffee filter!).

2. Sprinkle on the ground around plants before watering for a slow release of nitrogen.

3. It's said that a ring of used coffee grounds around a tree or planting will deter ants.

4. Take this a step further and ring an anthill with them.

5. Coffee grounds also help eliminate cutworms. Sprinkle them around the problem area.

6. Mix them with soil before planting houseplants or making a new garden.

7. Or just dump them on top of the soil in the pots of houseplants. They'll discourage mites and other small bugs as well as enrich the soil. Don't overdo it for container plants, though, because used grounds contain salts.

8. Use them in a worm bed. Worms love them.

9. Going fishing? Keep your worms happy in a container with moist, used coffee grounds.

Daily duties around the house can be enhanced by using coffee grounds:

1. A few grounds down the drain will gently scrape the sides of the pipe on the way down. (DON'T use them if the drain is already slow or stopped.)

2. Use them as a mild abrasive to clean grills, ovens, pots and pans and so on.

3. Got gunk? I mean like sticky, icky ash trays, or greasy pans? Scrub them with coffee grounds, dry or wet.

4. Spread a batch of coffee grounds to dry on a cookie sheet, then put them in a panty hose leg. Tie the top and put in the closet to absorb odors.

5. Or push the panty hose under the seat in a vehicle to keep it smelling good.

6. Use them dry in shallow containers to deodorize a refrigerator or any small space.

7. Steep used grounds in water and use a cotton swab or small paint brush to cover small scratches on furniture.

8. Put dried coffee grounds in a shaker and keep it by the kitchen sink to deodorize your hands when cooking. Scrub with them and fish, garlic, onion and other strong odors will disappear.

9. Make firelogs! Mix enough candle wax into coffee grounds to make a dense "log." As a matter of fact, a product called Java Logs is exactly that.

Coffee grounds go on the attack against cellulite, dead skin and gray hair, among other things:

1. Steep a cup or so in hot water, then use as a rinse to help cover gray.

2. Coffee grounds make a gentle exfoliating wash for your face. Wet your face and scrub with a tablespoonful of them.

3. Fill a muslin bag with used grounds and scrub yourself with it in the shower. It's a gentle exfoliator and deodorizer in one.

4. Rub warm, wet coffee grounds onto your skin and cover with plastic wrap for a few minutes before rinsing to fight cellulite.

5. A quarter cup of grounds mixed with an egg white makes a toning and firming facial. Massage it into your skin and allow it to dry, then rinse. If you have dry skin, follow with a moisturizer.

Crafts and fun for kids and adults, too.

1. Steep coffee grounds in hot water, then use it to dye paper for a parchment look.

2. Water from steeped coffee grounds make tan Easter eggs.

3. Make playdough or "stone" from them. (Directions are in the links on the sidebar.)

4. Dye cloth with water from steeped grounds. It will take a lot of grounds, but it works.

5. Punch a couple of holes in the bottoms of coffee cans and string ropes or twine through them to make stilts.

Now, what about those empty coffee cans??

1. Use a nail to punch holes in the bottom of a can and fill with grass or other seed. Put the lid on and just shake it as you walk along.

2. Use them for storage containers.

3. To protect young plants from wind or other adverse conditions, cut the bottoms out of coffee cans and place over each plant, pushing it firmly into the ground. Remove the can before the plants get so big that it will harm them.

4. Use them to raise melons, pumpkins or squash off the ground. Push the open end into the ground then put the fruit on or over it.

5. Take toilet paper camping in a coffee can to keep it dry.

P.S. With all these ideas, do you need more coffee grounds than you have? Your local Starbucks may be a good source, or any cafe or restaurant that serves coffee. Just ask.

Offline GR@PH;<'S

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Re: Help save a fellow member some money.
« Reply #14 on: March 22, 2006, 02:52:19 PM »
skittlespc,
you do realise that you can save mony on these 
Quote
Dishwasher Gels
by getting rid of your electric Dishwasher and reinstate the old one from infrunt of your TV.
or if you got lots of plates you could always    :hysterical:

GR@PH;<'S   :breakkie:
press Enter then have a Brandy then if the problem is still there have another Brandy
Q: does it work
A: It does seem to for a few hours at least.